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Jim Crow in North Carolina

Monday, Jan. 25, 4–7 p.m. via Zoom

Register here! This is an online event.

Jim Crow was a system of racial apartheid in the American South that lasted for nearly one hundred years, affecting every part of Southern life, from racial segregation to social etiquette. The system had many features, but its primary function was to promote and maintain a white supremacist racial order, the remnants of which are still shape our present. In this virtual workshop, we will explore the history of Jim Crow in North Carolina through a conversation with historian and legal scholar Richard Paschal, author of the new book Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920.

This will be followed by a special live stream of the musical “The Movement,” a historical acapella that chronicles the fight against Jim Crow that took place in the Children’s March of 1963. (Attendees are encouraged to grab their dinner, and invite their entire family to watch along. The show is designed for 4th graders through adults.)

Teachers will learn about resources for teaching about Jim Crow, including an overview of the newly launched website, On the Books, a project of UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries that provides the first-ever catalogue of searchable Jim Crow laws for the entire state of North Carolina. Attendees will learn about this innovative resource from a member of the project team, as well as explore the classroom materials available for teaching about Jim Crow and related themes in your classrooms.

**Prior to attending this event, participants are asked to read two brief articles about the book by Paschal and Jim Crow laws in general for context. Articles will be emailed.

**Attending K-12 teachers will receive a free book related to the program’s content after participating, with a choice of Freedom’s Children or Jim Crow in North Carolina. CEUs will be available..

This workshop is provided by Carolina K-12, the North Caroliniana Society, and the NC Museum of History, with funding from the North Caroliniana Society and the Braitmayer Foundation.