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Sit A Spell: Stories from the Museum's Porch

The logo for our blog, Sit a Spell, features two rocking chairs on a porch with a beautiful view of trees and woods.

Welcome to our blog, Sit A Spell: Stories from the Museum's Porch!

For history buffs and non-history enthusiasts, alike, this blog will continue telling the stories of North Carolina beyond the physical walls of the NC Museum of History! Sit A Spell will show the reader how drastically things have changed (or haven’t) in this wonderful state, and shed light on lesser-known figures and events from North Carolina, bringing their history to life.

This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Juneteenth: Freedom Day

By Earl Ijames

On June 19, 1865, enslaved African American men and women were to be emancipated throughout the former Confederate States of America.

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Lee Jacobs’s Quilt Can Speak

By Diana Bell-Kite

Lee Jacobs quilted to remember.  She commemorated life’s milestones by making wedding quilts, baby quilts, and housewarming quilts.

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Krispy Kreme's Delicious History​

By Kerry Burns

They say there’s nothing like the first time. Can you remember who you were with when you first smelled a “hot” Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut?

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Junior Johnson: Moonshine Legend

By Kerry Burns

Bootlegging moonshine was essentially a hereditary trait for Junior Johnson, a Wilkesboro, North Carolina native. 

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Secession of North Carolina

By Earl Ijames

North and South Carolina’s “split,” decreed from the British Crown, was complete by 1729. Since 1663, “Carolina” had a strong and independent spirit among all citizens. 

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Beyond the Exhibits

By Chelsea Weger

Educators, this one’s for you! You probably know the North Carolina Museum of History as a field trip destination, but you might not know about the wealth of educational resources we offer for use outside of the building. 

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This image shows Buck Leonard, an African American baseball player, who played in the Negro League.

Buck Leonard Knew Baseball

By Kerry Burns

Adversity, by definition, means “a state or instance of serious or continued difficulty or misfortune.” Born in Rocky Mount on September 8, 1907, the boy who became known as Buck Leonard was familiar with the term.

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Why Have a Film Festival at a History Museum?

By Sally Bloom

It’s simple. Making films is making history. Watching films is participating in shared culture and history. Stay with me here, because this is a subject near and dear to my heart. I am an educator at a history museum. And I am a film festival director at a history museum.

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Madelon "Glory" Hancock

By Charlie Knight

Although the United States did not officially enter World War I, or the Great War as it was known at the time, until April 1917, Americans were involved in the conflict almost from the beginning. One of the first was a nurse from Asheville named Madelon Hancock.

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This sepia image shows Madelon Hancock, a nurse from Asheville, North Carolina.

Life in Death: Ronald E. McNair’s Inspiration on My Life​

By Andre Taylor

Inside, I cheered as the shuttle soared into space, still paying close attention to what I was witnessing. And then, a voice from inside the shuttle reported back to mission control, “Throttle up.”

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A street sign reads "Yoda Dr." in Grover, North Carolina.

North Carolina's Connection to Star Wars​

By Kerry Burns

May the Fourth be with you! No, we’re not using an old Jedi mind trick on you; that really is a picture of a street called Yoda Drive, located in the town of Grover, North Carolina. In fact, this isn’t the only street named after a beloved Star Wars character in Grover.

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Our decorative arts curator, Michael Ausbon, is pictured here as a young boy in 1970 on his grandmother's front porch, with a swinging bench in the background.

Rockin’ and Reminiscing

By Michael Ausbon

Growing up as a young lad in Martin County, I passed many an afternoon into evening out with my Grandmother on her front porch. To this day, I still recall the perfume of the gargantuan gardenia bushes surrounding the porch like a fortress and the staccato cadence of raindrops performing their free concert on her tin roof.

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Our decorative arts curator, Michael Ausbon, is pictured here as a young boy in 1970 on his grandmother's front porch, with a swinging bench in the background.

Flu Pandemic of World War I

By Kerry Burns

One of the most deadly pandemics in modern history took place during World War I, from 1918 to 1919. Nearly one-third of the planet's population became infected with this horrible sickness, resulting in life expectancy dropping by over 10 years.

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