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AIHC 2020 Schedule and Registration

All interactive sessions are online-only and free. 

The 25th Annual American Indian Heritage Celebration will be online-only this year. Register below for interactive sessions. Registration is limited for all sessions, except for Music and Dance Performances. Enjoy watching our 25th Anniversary Celebratory Video and other on-demand videos from American Indian communities and from the museum, links coming soon! Live-streaming sessions will be recorded and made available as videos on demand as well. To see the festival schedule and registration links in table view, click here! Please note: The museum will be closed to the public on Friday, but open to the public on Saturday.

Saturday, November 21, 2020

11:30 am to 12:15 pm

Dr. Tracie Locklear-Beasley, Elderberry Syrup

Dr. Locklear- Beasley, a Research Assistant Professor at North Carolina Central University and Lumbee/Coharie, is both a pharmacognosist and a chemist of natural products. She works to assist communities seeking to re-establish healthy food traditions. Dr. Locklear-Beasley demonstrates how to make elderberry syrup; whose healing properties were known by indigenous peoples years ago.

Register Here!

Julian Hunter, Artist, Wampum and Jewelry

Julian Hunter, a member of the Meherrin Tribe is an experienced artisan, working in jewelry and wampum--a traditional shell bead, often made from whelk shells and from hard-shelled clams.

Register Here!

Panel: Water is Life: Environmental Issues and Native Communities.

Join a discussion of North Carolina environmental topics and their effects on Native communities. Learn how American Indians in our state are responding to and working to mitigate negative environmental outcomes.

Register Here!  Panelists include:

  • Phillip Bell, Volunteer Coordinator, Great Coharie River Initiative. Mr. Bell, a Coharie/Lumbee, is Volunteer Coordinator of the Great Coharie River Initiative. With this effort, he works to restore access to the River to the people for whom it served as a way of life for generations, and to others who appreciate the wonders of it.
  • Greg Jacobs, Coharie Tribal Administrator and Tribal Elder. Mr. Jacobs has long worked to restore the Coharie River for members of his tribe, other American Indians, and the public.
  • Dr. Ryan Emanuel, Professor in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources and a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Geospatial Analytics at NCSU. Dr. Emanuel, a member of the Lumbee Tribe, works in the intersection of environmental studies, water and bio/geo chemical processes, and natural and human-altered landscapes. His works illustrate the impact of environmental change on native communities while also noting how indigenous people can participate in policies affecting those situations.

Brian Lynch, Artist, Silverwork and Jewelry

Mr. Lynch is a member of the Haliwa Saponi Tribe and is a well-known silversmith worker and jewelry artist. His original works encompasses wampum, turquoise, and other natural materials.

Register Here!

Watch prerecorded videos anytime!

 

12:30 to 1:15 pm

Dr. Tracie Locklear-Beasley, Elderberry Syrup

Dr. Locklear- Beasley, a Research Assistant Professor at North Carolina Central University, and Lumbee/Coharie, is both a pharmacognosist and a chemist of natural products. She works to assist communities seeking to re-establish healthy food traditions. Dr. Locklear-Beasley demonstrates how to make elderberry syrup; whose healing properties were known by indigenous peoples years ago.

Register Here!

Jamie Locklear, Artist, Pine Needle Basketry

Mr. Locklear, a member of the Waccamaw Siouan Tribe, shares how pine needles, found throughout the state, can be used to create beautiful and functional baskets, and more. His outstanding artistry is demonstrated in his work.

Register Here!

Panel Discussion: Serving American Indian College Students During a Pandemic.  

Join the conversation to learn more about how COVID-19 is affecting Native college students from three North Carolina Universities and how student centers are supporting them.

Register Here! Panelists include:

  • Ashley M. Oxendine (Lumbee) is the American Indian Learning Community Coordinator at the Center for Student Success at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.
  • Qua Lynch Adkins (Haliwa-Saponi) is the Native Student Engagement Coordinator at the UNC American Indian Center
  • Sky Sampson (Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians) is the director of the Cherokee Center at Western Carolina University.

 

Watch prerecorded videos anytime!

1:30 to 2:15 pm

Author Talk: #OwnVoices: American Indian Youth Literature Award Winners.

Join us for a virtual conversation with two of the winning authors of the American Indian Library Association’s 2020 American Indian Youth Literature Award, Traci Sorell (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma) and Cynthia Leitich Smith (Muscogee Creek). Moderator Mandy Suhr-Sytsma is a senior lecturer in English Dept of Emory University and the author of Self-Determined Stories: The Indigenous Reinvention of Young Adult Literature.

Register Here! Panelists include:

  • Traci Sorell writes both fiction and non-fiction books for children. Two of Ms. Sorell’s books for young children, We Are Grateful/Otsaliheliga and At the Mountain’s Base, were honored by the 2020 American Indian Youth Literature Award. Indian No More, the winner of the middle school category, was written by Charlene Willing McManis (Umpqua and Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde) based on her family’s experiences after their tribe was “terminated” by the US government. Ms. McManis passed away in 2018 knowing that Indian No More would be completed by her friend, Ms. Sorell.
  • Cynthia Leitich Smith is the author of many books for children and young adults, including Jingle Dancer, Rain Is Not My Indian Name, and Indian Shoes. Cynthia is the author-curator of Heartdrum, a Native-focused imprint of HarperCollins Children's Books, which will launch its first list in winter 2021. Her young adult novel Hearts Unbroken won the Young Adult category. The new anthology Ancestor Approved: Intertribal Stories for Kids, edited by Ms. Leitich Smith and including a story by Ms. Sorell, will be released in the Spring of 2021.

 

Watch prerecorded videos anytime!

2:30 to 3:15 pm

Darlene Graham, Dyeing Fabric with Foods

Ms. Graham, a member of the Waccamaw Siouan Tribe, is an educator and artist, knowledgeable in traditional foodways as well as other uses of plants. She demonstrates how to dye fabric, using foods.

Register Here!

Sharn Jeffries, Contemporary Parallels to Traditional Ways

Mr. Jeffries, a member of the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation, works to continue the traditions of his tribe and recognizes parallels of these long-held ways with current renaissance of organic and free-range farming, heirloom varieties, and use of communal spaces. He knows how to build, trap, and hunt in traditional means.

Register Here!

Kay Richardson Oxendine, Pow-wows in North Carolina

Ms. Oxendine, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe, is the author of The Pow-wow Pocket Guide: Everything You Wanted to Know When Visiting a Pow-wow But Were Afraid to Ask. She is widely published in magazines and newspapers across the country and is currently a writer for the Phoenix Tribune

Register Here!

 

Watch prerecorded videos anytime!

3:30 to 4:15 pm

Darlene Graham, Dyeing Fabrics with Food

Ms. Graham, a member of the Waccamaw Siouan Tribe, is an educator and artist, knowledgeable in traditional foodways as well as other uses of plants. She demonstrates how to dye fabric, using foods.

Register Here!

Sharn Jeffries, Contemporary Parallels to Traditional Ways

Mr. Jeffries, a member of the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation, works to continue the traditions of his tribe and recognizes parallels of these long-held ways with current renaissance of organic and free-range farming, heirloom varieties, and use of communal spaces. He knows how to build, trap, and hunt in traditional means.

Register Here!

Panel Discussion: Climate Resilience in Tribal Communities

Join us for a conversation relating to this collaboration between the NC Commission of Indian Affairs and the NC Department of Environmental Quality. The joint effort supports tribal communities in considering opportunities and strategies for increased resilience to climate change.

Register Here!  Panelists include:

  • Beth Roach (Nottoway Tribe of Virginia), the director of the Tribal Resilience Program at the NC Commission of Indian Affairs, is coordinating discussions and outreach activities that will lead to implementing practices throughout tribal communities in North Carolina and Virginia.
  • Jocelyn Painter (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska), a graduate student at NC State, is conducting a study of the ways in which indigenous communities throughout the US are addressing climate resilience.

Kay Richardson Oxendine, Pow-wows in North Carolina

Ms. Oxendine, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe, is the author of The Pow-wow Pocket Guide: Everything You Wanted to Know When Visiting a Pow-wow But Were Afraid to Ask. She is widely published in magazines and newspapers across the country and is currently a writer for the Phoenix Tribune

Register Here!